Andrew Osis

Capital Markets: Does your team have what it takes? w. Andrew Osis – Ep. 51



SUMMARY

As a career capital markets pro, Andrew Osis, co-CEO of Magnetic North Acquisitions Corp, shares how building a team with the right skills can be the determining factor of a public company’s success. He has connected his corporate finance career to company building and he shares his experience with us today.

When companies go public, and even before, they need to have a solid understanding of the capital markets. However, in Canada, there is a critical shortage of these skills in publicly-traded companies, which play a determining role in success.

From analyst roles to investment banking positions, Andrew has evaluated countless deals, managed capital, and been through billions of dollars of transactions. His investment criteria include a review of market characteristics, risks, strategy, competition, customer focus, deal quality and entrepreneur, product and financial characteristics.

We kick this episode off by learning more about his 25-year plus capital markets career along with what Magnetic North does. They find companies with strong products or services which have management weaknesses, take control, and lend their expertise to turn things around. From there, we move onto the skills shortages Andrew typically sees in Canadian publicly-traded companies.

These skills can be attributed to the country’s historically resource-driven rather than value-add economy. He talks about how, previously, there was not a need for a sophisticated understanding of the capital markets, and despite that changing, the skills now needed have not caught up. We then turn our attention to some of Magnetic North’s deals and what they typically look for.

A career in capital markets

Andrew has been involved in more than $25 billion in transactions and held high caliber positions such as Vice President, Global Banking with RBC Dominion Securities Inc., Canada’s largest investment banking firm and has been CEO and CFO of various private and public companies.

Andrew sheds light on the demise of Poynt, during his time there. He shares how this period proved to be a proverbial a two-year Ph.D. in management sciences for him.

Finally, we round the show off with some of the overarching lessons Andrew has learned throughout his career. With his extensive experience in the capital markets, he has seen that the biggest piece of success ultimately is the people.

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Key Points From This Episode:

  • Learn about Andrew’s background and his experience in the capital markets.
  • Find out about the work that Magnetic North does and how they help companies.
  • Some of the common mistakes and skills shortages Andrew sees in companies.
  • How changes in the market have altered the role of investment bankers as advisors.
  • Where Canadian management teams fall short when their companies are public.
  • Andrew’s perspective on what a sophisticated capital markets approach entails.
  • Magnetic North’s investment portfolio and some of their success stories.
  • Characteristics of deals that typically catch Andrew’s eye.
  • Why Andrew does not let emotions cloud his judgment when assessing a deal.
  • Insights into Andrew’s time at Poynt and the lessons he learned from it.
  • How people involved in a company mitigate or increase risk and influence its success.
  • Andrew’s take on the current economic situation and the impact it’s likely to have.
  • Flexibility rather than preparation is what affects the ability to succeed at this time.
  • Final thoughts from Andrew and getting into contact with him.

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